(Click images for animation.)


(1.0 mb)

Stargate Atlantis: Vengeance
This was a fun short shot that had to be cranked out in just a couple of days. One of those rare occurrences where everything falls into place without a hitch.

 


( 2.6 mb)

Stargate Atlantis: Vengeance
To bring this shot to the level wanted I had to model/rig and match-move a 3D avatar to the actress' body, followed by sculpting and wrap deforming a lattice to line up with the 3D avatar. I was than able to run my animation of the bug through the setup and prevent the feet from sliding on contact. The setup alone took 2 weeks, leaving me a week to animate and a spare couple of days to blow up the bug, and develop a system for bug foot prints.


(15 mb)

Stargate Atlantis: Vengeance
This is an animation breakdown of the previous shot. It gives a quick description of the process I developed to animate the bug crawling up the actress' body.

 


(1.6 mb)

Stargate SG-1: Counterstrike
This was my first real opportunity to try out collisions in Maya. For the shot I modeled all of the solid rocks that you see, keyframed them over a few frames to create an initial velocity for the explosion and than turned on the dynamics. Once the simulation was run, the rocks had to be baked out and than given some custom love to make them feel at home. The dust cloud was created by Craig Van Den Biggelaar


(6.1 mb)

Stargate SG-1: Counterstrike
After completing the animation for the spaceships, I built a dummy ship and chopped it up into a bazillion pieces, swapped it out with the original ship at the moment of explosion and keyed all of the debris flying off into space. The explosions themselves were simply stock footage applied to cards in 3D space, rendered out, and than given a lot of love by Karen Watson in compositing.


(6.6 mb)

Stargate SG-1: Counterstrike
This is a playblast of the previous shot with a camera pan that I preferred over the final comp, but at the end of the day the client made the call to change it.



(2.8 mb)

Stargate SG-1: Bounty
Just a simple spaceship shot. I wanted to include this to illustrate the typical Stargate fare we were required to create for any given episode.

 


(0.8 mb)

Stargate SG-1: Bounty
Stargate SG-1, episode Bounty. I was charged with the task of having to simulate a corrugated steel ceiling being smashed through by the SG rings. I created the base model for the ceiling and than a dummy which I cut up and passed off to Brian Harder for a basic rig setup, before it was returned to me for the animation.


(2.1 mb)

Stargate Atlantis: Conversion
At the time, Image Engine had no crowd simulation software so this sequence required me to keyframe over 80 individual bug animations which were than hand placed throughout the cavern.

 


(1.9 mb)

Stargate Atlantis: Conversion
All together the cave had over 300 bugs in it. Each of the 4 shots had a library of animations ranging from background bugs with generic reusable/repeatable animation, to foreground hero bugs that needed to be fully polished for a one time only performance. Once the animation library was stocked, the cave was strategically populated with bugs so that duplicate animations wouldn't be to noticeable.


(0.6 mb)
Stargate Atlantis: Conversion
Once background bugs were in place, the hero bugs with unique performances were brought in and positioned. The sequence was then sent off to the client for approval before massive cleanup began. Cleanup saw the tedious process of fixing any pops in animation, making sure feet contacted with the ground correctly, body parts didn't drift through neighboring bugs and rocks, and generally, no bug stood out of the pack that wasn't suppose to.

(0.5 mb)

Stargate Atlantis: Conversion
This was the final shot in the sequence. It was the shortest, at just over a second of screen time, but by far the toughest in the entire show to create. The shot had nearly 30 hero bugs and demanded customization of almost every bug in the entire scene. All together the animation on Conversion had a turn around of about 3-4 weeks with this shot alone gobbling up almost half of that time.


(1.9 mb)

Stargate SG-1: Uninvited
Despite how hideous and nasty the creatures I sometimes animate can be, I often times find myself developing a strange sort of affection for them. I don't think I am alone on this either as this episode's mutant-zombie-bear-monster, was lovingly named Fluffy by the Image Engine VFX crew. Unfortunately the poor sucker had to die.

 


(1.4 mb)

Stargate SG-1: Uninvited
See Fluffy play dead?

 


(1.7 mb)

Stargate SG-1: Uninvited
This was one of the opening shots for Uninvited. An alien leach crawls out of the guts of a dead mutant-zombie-bear-monster before terrorizing the SG team.

 


(2.7 mb)

Stargate Atlantis: The Hive
I got to storyboard this show, so the shots that I animated I saw through from conceptualization all the way through to the final product.
It's always fun when you can get in on the ground floor and pitch your own ideas.

 


(3.5 mb)

Stargate Atlantis: The Hive
Another space battle shot. I was responsible for storyboards and the small fighter battle between the two motherships. The mothership and camera animation was created by another animator at Image Engine.


(4.8 mb)

Stargate Atlantis: The Hive
This shot allowed me to innovate a solution for the onset of a giant space battle. A lot of fun actually. The ships were grouped into formations and animated between individual ship controls and formation controls. The lasers were spawned from emitters attached to the nose of each ship and controlled via various scripts linking the spurts of gun fire to explosions within the opposing fleet.